Why Does the Easter Bunny hate you?

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Yesterday, we saw that the Easter Bunny hats us.  But why?  This video explains it all!

Take all necessary precautions if you encounter the Easter Bunny!

 

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The Horrible Truth Caught on Video: The Easter Bunny Hates You 2015

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Good morning!  Don is having some technical problems at the Southern Branch of the CH 2.0 Bunker, so, I’m again drafted out of semi-retirement to run the show for a brief while.

Here is a classic Easter post, featuring the dark side of everyone’s favorite bunny…

We all think of the Easter Bunny as the kind woodland critter that hides candy for kiddos every Easter.  However, a shocking video has surfaced that will cause many to change their perception of the notorious Easter character.

It’s awful to see a national icon go bad. I can only imagine what drove the normally docile Easter Bunny to such extremes.

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History of the Time’s Square New Year’s Eve Ball Dropping Ceremony

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Times Square NYE 1907 Rehearsal For First Ball Drop
Times Square NYE 1907 Rehearsal For First Ball Drop

Hat/Tip to Times Square Alliance and NPR.org.

Over a million people packed into Times Square last night to ring in the new year by watching the ball drop. Below, is a brief history of how that came to be, and the changes made along the way.

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About “Time-Balls”

Times Square NYE Balls 005The actual notion of a ball “dropping” to signal the passage of time dates back long before New Year’s Eve was ever celebrated in Times Square. The first “time-ball” was installed atop England’s Royal Observatory at Greenwich in 1833. This ball would drop at one o’clock every afternoon, allowing the captains of nearby ships to precisely set their chronometers (a vital navigational instrument).

Around 150 public time-balls are believed to have been installed around the world after the success at Greenwich, though few survive and still work. The tradition is carried on today in places like the United States Naval Observatory in Washington, DC, where a time-ball descends from a flagpole at noon each day – and of course, once a year in Times Square, where it marks the stroke of midnight not for a few ships’ captains, but for over one billion people watching worldwide.

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History of the New Year’s Eve Ball

Revelers began celebrating New Year’s Eve in Times Square as early as 1904, but it was in 1907 that the New Year’s Eve Ball made its maiden Times Square NYE Balls 006descent from the flagpole atop One Times Square. Seven versions of the Ball have been designed to signal the New Year.

The first New Year’s Eve Ball, made of iron and wood and adorned with one hundred 25-watt light bulbs, was 5 feet in diameter and weighed 700 pounds. It was built by a young immigrant metalworker named Jacob Starr, and for most of the twentieth century the company he founded, sign maker Artkraft Strauss, was responsible for lowering the Ball.

As part of the 1907-1908 festivities, waiters in the fabled “lobster palaces” and other deluxe eateries in hotels surrounding Times Square were supplied with battery-powered top hats emblazoned with the numbers “1908” fashioned of tiny light bulbs. At the stroke of midnight, they all “flipped their lids” and the year on their foreheads lit up in conjunction with the numbers “1908” on the parapet of the Times Tower lighting up to signal the arrival of the new year.

Times Square NYE Balls 003The Ball has been lowered every year since 1907, with the exceptions of 1942 and 1943, when the ceremony was suspended due to the wartime “dimout” of lights in New York City. Nevertheless, the crowds still gathered in Times Square in those years and greeted the New Year with a minute of silence followed by the ringing of chimes from sound trucks parked at the base of the tower—a harkening-back to the earlier celebrations at Trinity Church, where crowds would gather to “ring out the old, ring in the new.”

In 1920, a 400 pound Ball made entirely of wrought iron replaced the original. In 1955, the iron Ball was replaced with an aluminum Ball weighing a mere 150 pounds. This aluminum Ball remained unchanged until the 1980s, when red light bulbs and the addition of a green stem converted the Ball into an apple for the “I Love New York” marketing campaign from 1981 until 1988. After seven Times Square NYE Balls 004years, the traditional glowing white Ball with white light bulbs and without the green stem returned to brightly light the sky above Times Square. In 1995, the Ball was upgraded with aluminum skin, rhinestones, strobes, and computer controls, but the aluminum Ball was lowered for the last time in 1998.

For Times Square 2000, the millennium celebration at the Crossroads of the World, the New Year’s Eve Ball was completely redesigned by Waterford Crystal and Philips Lighting. The crystal Ball combined the latest in lighting technology with the most traditional of materials, reminding us of our past as we gazed into the future and the beginning of a new millennium.

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The Different Designs Of The Ball

Times Square NYE 1963The first ball, designed in 1907, was made of wood and 100 light bulbs, and measured 5 feet in diameter. For the sake of comparison: Today’s ball is more than twice as wide, weighs 11,875 pounds, and is covered in 32,256 LED lights. Oh, and is made of Waterford Crystal. So how did it evolve from wood and iron to a literal crystal ball?

In between these two designs were five other iterations, according to this Times Square info site. Here’s a quick outline:

1907: The first ball is built of wood, iron and 100 light bulbs.

1920: It’s replaced by a 400-pound iron ball. This ball is used every year until 1955 — except for 1942 and 1943, during WWII, when a ball is not dropped.

1955: An aluminum ball weighing 140 pounds is introduced — with 80 additional light bulbs.

1995: The ball is upgraded with aluminum skin, computerized controls and rhinestones.

1999: A new ball is built just for the millennial celebration.

2007: The ball gets a face-lift with LED lights for the 100th anniversary of the drop ritual.

2008: Apparently it wasn’t big enough. A new ball, twice the size of the 2007 version, is unveiled.

 

Times Square NYE Balls 001

 

Have safe and prosperous New Year from all of us at Conservative Hideout 2.0!

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WEEWEECHU

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One beautiful December evening Pedro and his girlfriend 

Rosita were sitting by the side of the ocean.

It was a romantic full moon, when Pedro said,

“Hey, mamacita, let’s play Weeweechu.”

“Oh no, not now, lets look at the moon” said Rosita.

“Oh, c’mon baby, let’s you and I play Weeweechu.

“I love you and it’s the perfect time,” Pedro begged.

“But I wanna just hold your hand and watch the moon.”

“Please, corazoncito, just once, play Weeweechu with me.”

Rosita looked at Pedro and said, “OK, one time, we’ll play Weeweechu.”

Pedro grabbed his guitar and they both sang…..

“Weeweechu a Merry Christmas,”

“Weeweechu a Merry Christmas,”

“Weeweechu a Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year.”

MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE

FROM THE WOODSTERMAN FAMILY!

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Merry Christmas: Dean Martin Style

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I’m feeling a little more nostalgic than normal this Christmas season. It’s been decades since I’ve seen snow and I’ve been remembering some of those special Christmas Eve nights of my childhood when snow would be softly falling. There was something magical about Christmas Eve with the snow falling and all the homes radiating their beautifully lighted displays. So, if you are fortunate enough to live where you have a white Christmas this year, enjoy its splendor and give a thought to this old man. If not, dream along with one of my favorite carols by Dean Martin.

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The Reason For The Season: The Story Of The First Christmas

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Nativity Wallpaper

 

On behalf of our Publisher Matt Ross, our Staff, our great team of Contributors, and myself, Don King, Managing Editor we here at Conservative Hideout 2.0 want to wish you a very Merry Christmas. May you know peace and find comfort in the sacrifice that Jesus made for all of us. It is at this time of year when we pause to celebrate the birth of Jesus our Lord and Saviour, so it is fitting that we revisit the story of the very first Christmas.

In the spirit of the season, with many thanks to WhyChristmas.com and WYMT of Hazard, Kentucky, here is the greatest story ever told…

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The Birth of Jesus

The Story in the Bible

In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. (This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.) And everyone went to his own town to register.

So Joseph also went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to Bethlehem the town of David, because he belonged to the house and line of David. He went there to register with Mary, who was pledged to be married to him and was expecting a child. While they were there, the time came for the baby to be born, and she gave birth to her firstborn, a son. She wrapped him in cloths and placed him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.

Luke 2:1-7

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The History behind the Birth of Jesus in the Christmas Story

The census that was ordered by Caesar Augustus was the first of its kind. It was done because the Roman government wanted to make sure that everyone in the Empire was paying their taxes correctly. The census was carried out all over Empire (most of Europe): but in Palestine, it was carried out in a Jewish way rather than a Roman way. This meant that families had to register in the their historical tribal town rather than where they lived. This also meant that Joseph and the very pregnant Mary would have had to travel from Nazareth to Bethlehem, as this was town that Joseph’s family (the royal family of David) originally came from – a journey of about 70 miles (112 kilometres).

It might have been quite good for the family to go to Bethlehem as no one there knew them, so people would not have talked about the fact that they were not married. Some people think that Joseph might had family in Bethlehem, but they still wouldn’t have know Mary and Joseph very closely.

The journey would have taken about three days and they might well have arrived in the evening, because if they had arrived earlier in the day, it is more likely that they would have found somewhere to stay.

In those times, there weren’t really such things as motels or inns, you normally would have stayed with some extended family. A more accurate translation of ‘inn’ would be ‘guest room’. You would normally stay with extended family in their ‘guest room’ but as it was a busy time the guest room was already full.

Most houses would have been shared with the animals that the family kept. Houses had two levels, the upper/mezzanine level where people slept and the ground floor where the animals slept at night and the family lived during the day. The animals were a kind of ‘central heating’ at night keeping the house warm! The ‘guest room’ was often an area on the upper/mezzanine level or even a hut put on the flat roof of the house!

As many people would have traveled to Bethlehem for the census, all the houses, or certainly upper levels were full. Many people think that Jesus was probably born in September or October during Sukkot, the Jewish Feast of Tabernacles, rather than during December. During the festival, Jews live outside in temporary shelters (the word ‘tabernacle’ come from a latin word meaning ‘booth’ or ‘hut’).

So Joseph and Mary probably had to sleep with the animals on the low level (where it’s common to have a manger cut into a wall where you put the animal food) or out in a stable, cave or even a covered market stall that sold animals (these stalls could be rented during tabernacles).

It was the custom in those times to wrap a new born baby very tightly in long bandages called swaddling clothes. The arms and legs of the baby were also wrapped, so they couldn’t move. This was done because they thought it helped the baby to grow strong, straight limbs! And as no proper crib was available, the new baby boy was placed in a manger, or feeding trough.

This must have been an amazing scene, but was exactly how the angels had described things to the shepherds up on the hills surrounding Bethlehem!

The birth of Jesus probably didn’t happen in the year 0AD but slightly earlier, in about 5, 6 or 7BC. The dates that we use now were set by Monks and religious leaders in the Middle Ages and before. It’s also quite likely that Jesus was actually born in the autumn (during Tabernacles), not in the winter! It can get very cold in the winter in Israel and it is thought that the census would have most likely taken place during the spring or autumn, at a time when many pilgrims, from all over the country, came to visit Jerusalem (which is about six miles from Bethlehem). Also during the winter, it’s less likely that the shepherds would have been keeping sheep out on the hills (as those hills can get quite a lot of snow during winter sometimes!).

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The First Christmas

As told by Neil Middleton, General Manager of WYMT of Hazard, KY

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Must See Video: Drumming In A Snow Storm – Candy Cane Drumsticks, Elf Shoes And All!

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Hat/Tip to Drum Talk TV.

Awesome video, fun to watch and the drumming is pretty snazzy, too.

Here’s a bit of holiday spirit for you, courtesy of Drum Talk TV fan Joey Muha! Please don’t pile on because he played the drums in a blizzard. No drums, cymbals or hardware were injured in the making of this video!

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Why We Eat Turkey On Thanksgiving Day

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When Americans sit down with their families for Thanksgiving dinner, most of us will probably gorge ourselves on the same traditional Thanksgiving menu, with turkey, cranberry sauce, stuffing, and pumpkin pie taking up the most real estate on our plates. How did these dishes become the national “what you eat on Thanksgiving” options, though?

THE PILGRIMS MAY NOT HAVE HAD TURKEY

Turkey may not have been on the menu at the 1621 celebration by the Pilgrims of Plymouth that is considered the First Thanksgiving (though historians and fans of Virginia’s Berkeley Plantation might quibble with the “First” part). There were definitely wild turkeys in the Plymouth area, as colonist William Bradford noted in his journal. However, the best existing account of the Pilgrims’ harvest feast comes from colonist Edward Winslow, author of Mourt’s Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. Winslow’s first-hand account of the First Thanksgiving included no explicit mention of turkey. He does, however, mention the Pilgrims gathering “wild fowl” for the meal, although that could just as likely have meant ducks or geese.

SO WHY DO WE CHOW DOWN ON TURKEY, THEN?

It helps to know a bit about the history of Thanksgiving. While the idea of giving thanks and celebrating the harvest was popular in certain parts of the country, it was by no means an annual national holiday. Presidents would occasionally declare a Thanksgiving Day celebration, but the holiday hadn’t completely caught on nationwide. Many of these early celebrations included turkey; Alexander Hamilton once remarked that, “No citizen of the U.S. shall refrain from turkey on Thanksgiving Day.”

When Bradford’s journals were reprinted in 1856 after being lost for a century, they found a receptive audience with advocates who wanted Thanksgiving turned into a national holiday. Since Bradford wrote of how the colonists had hunted wild turkeys during the autumn of 1621 and since turkey is a uniquely American (and scrumptious) bird, it gained traction as the Thanksgiving meal of choice for Americans after Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863.

Moreover, there were pragmatic reasons for eating turkey rather than, say, chicken at a feast like Thanksgiving. The birds are large enough that they can feed a table full of hungry family members, and unlike chickens or cows, they didn’t serve much utilitarian purpose like laying eggs or making milk. Unlike pork, turkey wasn’t so common that it didn’t seem like a suitable choice for a special occasion, either. An interesting 2007 piece in Slate discussed these reasons for turkey’s prominence, but also made another intriguing point. The publication of A Christmas Carol in 1843 may have helped force along the turkey’s cause as a holiday delicacy when Scrooge magnanimously sends the Cratchit family a Christmas turkey.

THERE WAS NO CRANBERRY SAUCE, EITHER

cranberry-sauce-istock.jpgWhile the cranberries the Pilgrims needed were probably easy to come by, making cranberry sauce requires sugar. Sugar was a rare luxury at the time of the First Thanksgiving, so while revelers may have eaten cranberries, it’s unlikely that the feast featured the tasty sauce. What’s more, it’s not even entirely clear that cranberry sauce had been invented yet. It’s not until 1663 that visitors to the area started commenting on a sweet sauce made of boiled cranberries that accompanied meat. There’s the same problem with potatoes. Neither sweet potatoes nor white potatoes were available to the colonists in 1621, so the Pilgrims definitely didn’t feast on everyone’s favorite tubers.

THEY DID HAVE PLENTY OF VENISON, THOUGH

Winslow mentions in his writings that the governor sent out a party of four men to do some fowling for the feast, but the Pilgrims and Wampanoag also enjoyed five deer as part of their feasting. The meat supposedly arrived at the celebration as a gift from the Wampanoag king Massasoit. On top of the venison, other meats probably included lots of fish and shellfish, which were staples of the Pilgrims’ diets. So if you want to wolf down a lobster or some oysters in lieu of turkey on Thursday, nobody can fault you for being historically inaccurate.

AND PUMPKIN PIE DIDN’T CAP THINGS OFF

pumpkin-pie.jpgIt may be the flagship dessert at modern Thanksgiving dinners, but pumpkin pie didn’t make an appearance at the First Thanksgiving. The Pilgrims probably lacked the butter and flour needed to make a pie crust, and it’s not clear that they even had an oven in which they could have baked a pumpkin pie. That doesn’t mean pumpkins weren’t available for the meal, though; they were probably served after being baked in the coals of a fire or stewed. Pumpkin pie became a popular dish on 17th-century American tables, though, and it might have shown up for Thanksgiving as early as the 1623 celebration of the holiday.

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Abraham Lincoln’s Proclamation Of Thanksgiving

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Proclamation of Thanksgiving

 

This is the proclamation which set the precedent for America’s national day of Thanksgiving. During his administration, President Lincoln issued many orders similar to this. For example, on November 28, 1861, he ordered government departments closed for a local day of thanksgiving.

Sarah Josepha Hale, a 74-year-old magazine editor, wrote a letter to Lincoln on September 28, 1863, urging him to have the “day of our annual Thanksgiving made a National and fixed Union Festival.” She explained, “You may have observed that, for some years past, there has been an increasing interest felt in our land to have the Thanksgiving held on the same day, in all the States; it now needs National recognition and authoritive fixation, only, to become permanently, an American custom and institution.”

Prior to this, each state scheduled its own Thanksgiving holiday at different times, mainly in New England and other Northern states. President Lincoln responded to Mrs. Hale’s request immediately, unlike several of his predecessors, who ignored her petitions altogether. In her letter to Lincoln she mentioned that she had been advocating a national thanksgiving date for 15 years as the editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book. George Washington was the first president to proclaim a day of thanksgiving, issuing his request on October 3, 1789, exactly 74 years before Lincoln’s.

The document below sets apart the last Thursday of November “as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise.” According to an April 1, 1864, letter from John Nicolay, one of President Lincoln’s secretaries, this document was written by Secretary of State William Seward, and the original was in his handwriting. On October 3, 1863, fellow Cabinet member Gideon Welles recorded in his diary how he complimented Seward on his work. A year later the manuscript was sold to benefit Union troops.

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Washington, D.C.
October 3, 1863

By the President of the United States of America.

A Proclamation.

The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle or the ship; the axe has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consiousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington, this Third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the Unites States the Eighty-eighth.

By the President: Abraham Lincoln

William H. Seward,
Secretary of State

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A Look Back At Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

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On behalf of myself and the entire staff here at Conservative Hideout 2.0, we want to wish you the warmest, fun-filled and enjoyable Thanksgiving. To that end, we’ve taken a break for one day, from reporting the news so that our staff could do the same.

Happy Thanksgiving!!

 

 

Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade – Top 10 Facts

Secrets Behind the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade!

25 Little Known Facts About Thanksgiving

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade – New York, 1939 (color 8mm film)

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The Grinch Who Moved Thanksgiving

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Over the river and through the wood, to Grandfather’s house we go…Ah, Thanksgiving, our loveliest secular holiday. Even the Masters of War can’t dislodge it – though FDR tried his damndest.

George Washington issued the first National Thanksgiving Proclamation on November 26, 1789, but the early presidents, disproportionately Virginian and of a states’ rights disposition, regarded such proclamations as excessively Yankee and Federalist. Even John Quincy Adams, the ultimate codfish President, was reluctant to be seen as “introducing New England manners” by a public acknowledgement of Thanksgiving.

The antebellum New England novelist and editor Sarah Josepha Hale is to Thanksgiving what Stevie Wonder is to Martin Luther King Day. The indefatigable Hale propagandized ceaselessly for the glory of late November Thursdays, pumpkin pie, roasted turkey, “savory stuffing”—everything but the Detroit Lions. It took 35 years and a civil war, but Mrs. Hale’s efforts paid off when President Lincoln declared the last Thursday in November a national day of Thanksgiving and a legal holiday.

Andrew Johnson, ever the contrarian, designated his first Thanksgiving Day in December, but his successor, Ulysses Grant, began a 70-year practice of setting the date on the last Thursday in November. The states were free to go their own ways, and Southern governors often opted for idiosyncratic observances or none at all. As Thanksgiving historian Diana Karter Applebaum notes, Texas Governor Oran Milo Roberts refused to declare Thanksgiving in the Lone Star State, sneering, “It’s a damned Yankee institution anyway.” But the South, too, eventually succumbed to this succulent and sacred day.

Then along came Franklin D. Roosevelt.

It seems that in 1939 Thanksgiving was to fall on November 30th, a matter of consternation to the big merchants of the National Retail Dry Goods Association (NRDGA). The presidents of Gimbel Brothers, Lord & Taylor, and other unsentimental vendors petitioned President Roosevelt to move Thanksgiving to the previous Thursday, November 23, thus creating an additional week of Christmas shopping—and to the astonishment of those Americans without dollar signs in their eyes, the President did so. (Not all merchants favored the shift. One Kokomo shopkeeper hung a sign in his window reading, “Do your shopping now. Who knows, tomorrow may be Christmas.”)

Opinion polls revealed that more than 60 percent of Americans opposed the Rooseveltian ukase; dissent was especially vigorous in New England. The selectmen of Plymouth, Massachusetts informed the President, “It is a religious holiday and [you] have no right to change it for commercial reasons.” Thanksgiving is a day to give thanks to the Almighty, harrumphed Governor Leverett Saltonstall of Massachusetts, “and not for the inauguration of Christmas shopping.”

Although the states customarily followed the federal government’s lead on Thanksgiving, they retained the right to set their own date for the holiday, so 48 battles erupted. As usual, New Deal foes had all the wit, if not the votes. A New Hampshire senator urged the President to abolish winter; the Oregon attorney general versified:

Thirty days hath September,

April, June, and November;

All the rest have thirty-one.

Until we hear from Washington.

Twenty-three states celebrated Thanksgiving 1939 on November 23, and another 23 stood fast with November 30. Two states, Colorado and Texas, shrugged their shoulders and celebrated both days—Texas did so to avoid having to move the Texas-Texas A&M football game.

This New Deal experiment in Gimbelism lasted two more years, until finally the NRDGA admitted that there was little difference in retail sales figures between the states that celebrated Thanksgiving early and those that clung to the traditional date. Without fanfare, President Roosevelt returned Thanksgiving 1942 to the last Thursday in November. Mark Sullivan remarked that this was the only New Deal initiative FDR ever renounced.

Just as Roosevelt’s megalomaniacal refusal to observe the two-term tradition set by George Washington necessitated the 22nd Amendment, so did his flouting of Thanksgiving precedent require corrective legislation. In a compromise of sorts, FDR signed into law a bill fixing Thanksgiving as the fourth Thursday—not the last Thursday—in November. Never again would Thanksgiving fall on November 29th or 30th. The states followed suit, although Texas held out until 1956.

As we gather together this Thanksgiving, say a silent thanks for Sarah Josepha Hale. And save a drumstick for the resisters—then and now.

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The Story of the First Thanksgiving 2014

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This is the annual CH 2.0 re-telling of the true story of the first Thanksgiving.

By Matt Ross

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I heard  this story years ago, so I thought I’d post it.

The official story has the pilgrims boarding the Mayflower, coming to America and establishing the Plymouth colony in the winter of 1620-21. This first winter is hard, and half the colonists die. But the survivors are hard working and tenacious, and they learn new farming techniques from the Indians. The harvest of 1621 is bountiful. The Pilgrims hold a celebration, and give thanks to God. They are grateful for the wonderful new abundant land He has given them.

The official story then has the Pilgrims living more or less happily ever after, each year repeating the first Thanksgiving. Other early colonies also have hard times at first, but they soon prosper and adopt the annual tradition of giving thanks for this prosperous new land called America.

The problem with this official story is that the harvest of 1621 was not bountiful, nor were the colonists hardworking or tenacious. 1621 was a famine year and many of the colonists were lazy thieves.

In his ‘History of Plymouth Plantation,’ the governor of the colony, William Bradford, reported that the colonists went hungry for years, because they refused to work in the fields. They preferred instead to steal food. He says the colony was riddled with “corruption,” and with “confusion and discontent.” The crops were small because “much was stolen both by night and day, before it became scarce eatable.”

In the harvest feasts of 1621 and 1622, “all had their hungry bellies filled,” but only briefly. The prevailing condition during those years was not the abundance the official story claims, it was famine and death. The first “Thanksgiving” was not so much a celebration as it was the last meal of condemned men.

But in subsequent years something changes. The harvest of 1623 was different. Suddenly, “instead of famine now God gave them plenty,” Bradford wrote, “and the face of things was changed, to the rejoicing of the hearts of many, for which they blessed God.” Thereafter, he wrote, “any general want or famine hath not been amongst them since to this day.” In fact, in 1624, so much food was produced that the colonists were able to begin exporting corn

What happened?

After the poor harvest of 1622, writes Bradford, “they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop.” They began to question their form of economic organization.

This had required that “all profits & benefits that are got by trade, working, fishing, or any other means” were to be placed in the common stock of the colony, and that, “all such persons as are of this colony, are to have their meat, drink, apparel, and all provisions out of the common stock.” A person was to put into the common stock all he could, and take out only what he needed.

This “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need” was an early form of socialism, and it is why the Pilgrims were starving. Bradford writes that “young men that are most able and fit for labor and service” complained about being forced to “spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children.” Also, “the strong, or man of parts, had no more in division of victuals and clothes, than he that was weak.” So the young and strong refused to work and the total amount of food produced was never adequate.

To rectify this situation, in 1623 Bradford abolished socialism. He gave each household a parcel of land and told them they could keep what they produced, or trade it away as they saw fit. In other words, he replaced socialism with a free market, and that was the end of famines.

Many early groups of colonists set up socialist states, all with the same terrible results. At Jamestown, established in 1607, out of every shipload of settlers that arrived, less than half would survive their first twelve months in America. Most of the work was being done by only one-fifth of the men, the other four-fifths choosing to be parasites. In the winter of 1609-10, called “The Starving Time,” the population fell from five-hundred to sixty.

Then the Jamestown colony was converted to a free market, and the results were every bit as dramatic as those at Plymouth. In 1614, Colony Secretary Ralph Hamor wrote that after the switch there was “plenty of food, which every man by his own industry may easily and doth procure.” He said that when the socialist system had prevailed, “we reaped not so much corn from the labors of thirty men as three men have done for themselves now.”

Happy Thanksgiving all.  Thanks for all of your comments and encouragement.

Source: Mises Institute

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Veterans Day: 2014

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Veterans hold a place in our society that is special. I know that they hold a place in my heart. My father served in WWII with the Marines in the South Pacific. The first action he saw was during the invasion of Okinawa. Later, he was 150 miles from the Japanese mainland when for the first time in his life he saw a mushroom cloud. Dad told me that his unit had already received orders to go the China coast in an effort to surround Japan. Thank God he did not have to go.

My younger brother served in the Navy during the first Gulf War. He was on a submarine tender and to this day, he can weld underwater. But as he says from his home in Northern Illinois, there isn’t a big call for that there.

I wanted to serve, but was deemed ineligible to serve because of a congenital heart defect. The Navy had tried to recruit me for their Nuclear Engineering program, and I often wonder how differently my life would have turned out, had I been able to serve.

A brief history of Veterans Day taken from va.gov – “In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”

The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business beginning at 11:00 a.m.

The United States Congress officially recognized the end of World War I when it passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, with these words:

Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the cessation of the most destructive, sanguinary, and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful relations with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, and

Whereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; and

Whereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation calling upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable places, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples.”

In 1954, Eisenhower altered Armistice Day by proclamation – “In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans’ organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to join hands in the common purpose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans’ Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible.”

This change came about because of a store owner in Emporia, Kansas. A man named Al King wanted to celebrate all veterans, not just the World War I vets. He persuaded his Chamber of Commerce to get behind him on this, along with Emporia’s Board of Education. King turned to Republican U.S. Representative from Emporia, Ed Rees for assistance. Rees submitted the bill, causing Eisenhower to sign it into law, issuing the above proclamation.

As we fight this ongoing battle for freedom and liberty, we must take heart from that shoe store owner, Al King. One man and his idea, plus initiative and dedication DID make a difference. We can too. We owe it to all the veterans who gave their lives and sacrificed so that all Americans are free. They did not die, so that all Americans could become complacent. Freedom is worth fighting for and we must remember that were it not for those Americans that came before us, fighting and in many cases, dying for freedom, we would not even be able to have these discussions.

I want to leave you all with a poem by Joanna Fuchs:

To rule the world with violence
Is their one and only goal;
Terror is their method;
They want complete control.

 

We’ve seen it all before,
And we could not let it be;
We gave our lives for freedom,
For the world, and for you and me.

 

We fight all forms of oppression,
Helping victims far and near,
To keep the world from chaos,
To protect what we hold dear.

 

America’s the only country
That gives with its whole heart,
And asks so very little;
We always do our part.

 

So let’s unite again
To subdue our newest foe,
Whatever we must do,
Wherever we must go.

 

Let’s show the world once more
That America is blessed
With people who are heroes,
Who meet each and every test.

God Bless America, and God Bless our brave and valiant military.

Note that this is a re-post.

always a soldier.

.

 

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Mother’s Day in America: A History

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Thanks to History.com for this fascinating history of Mother’s Day in America and around the world.

Happy Mother's Day
Happy Mother’s Day

Celebrations of mothers and motherhood can be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who held festivals in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele, but the clearest modern precedent for Mother’s Day is the early Christian festival known as “Mothering Sunday.” Once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, this celebration fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent and was originally seen as a time when the faithful would return to their “mother church”—the main church in the vicinity of their home—for a special service. Over time the Mothering Sunday tradition shifted into a more secular holiday, and children would present their mothers with flowers and other tokens of appreciation. This custom eventually faded in popularity before merging with the American Mother’s Day in the 1930s and 1940s.

Did you know?

More phone calls are made on Mother’s Day than any other day of the year. These holiday chats with Mom often cause phone traffic to spike by as much as 37 percent.

The roots of the modern American Mother’s Day date back to the 19th century. In the years before the Civil War (1861-65), Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia helped start “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach local women how to properly care for their children. These clubs later became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868 Jarvis organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” at which mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.

Another precursor to Mother’s Day came from the abolitionist and suffragette Julia Ward Howe. In 1870 Howe wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. In 1873 Howe campaigned for a “Mother’s Peace Day” to be celebrated every June 2. Other early Mother’s Day pioneers include Juliet Calhoun Blakely, a temperance activist who inspired a local Mother’s Day in Albion, Michigan, in the 1870s. The duo of Mary Towles Sasseen and Frank Hering, meanwhile, both worked to organize a Mothers’ Day in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Some have even called Hering “the father of Mothers’ Day.”

The incarnation of the Mother’s Day we all know and love had some very interesting roots.

The official Mother’s Day holiday arose in the 1900s as a result of the efforts of Anna Jarvis, daughter of Ann Reeves Jarvis. Following her mother’s 1905 death, Anna Jarvis conceived of Mother’s Day as a way of honoring the sacrifices mothers made for their children. After gaining financial backing from a Philadelphia department store owner named John Wanamaker, in May 1908 she organized the first official Mother’s Day celebration at a Methodist church in Grafton, West Virginia. That same day also saw thousands of people attend a Mother’s Day event at one of Wanamaker’s retail stores in Philadelphia.

Following the success of her first Mother’s Day, Jarvis—who remained unmarried and childless her whole life—resolved to see her holiday added to the national calendar. Arguing that American holidays were biased toward male achievements, she started a massive letter writing campaign to newspapers and prominent politicians urging the adoption of a special day honoring motherhood. By 1912 many states, towns and churches had adopted Mother’s Day as an annual holiday, and Jarvis had established the Mother’s Day International Association to help promote her cause. Her persistence paid off in 1914 when President Woodrow Wilson signed a measure officially establishing the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.

Anna Jarvis had originally conceived of Mother’s Day as a day of personal celebration between mothers and families. Her version of the day involved wearing a white carnation as a badge and visiting one’s mother or attending church services. But once Mother’s Day became a national holiday, it was not long before florists, card companies and other merchants capitalized on its popularity.

While Jarvis had initially worked with the floral industry to help raise Mother’s Day’s profile, by 1920 she had become disgusted with how the holiday had been commercialized. She outwardly denounced the transformation and urged people to stop buying Mother’s Day flowers, cards and candies. Jarvis eventually resorted to an open campaign against Mother’s Day profiteers, speaking out against confectioners, florists and even charities. She also launched countless lawsuits against groups that had used the name “Mother’s Day,” eventually spending most of her personal wealth in legal fees. By the time of her death in 1948 Jarvis had disowned the holiday altogether, and even actively lobbied the government to see it removed from the American calendar.
 

Mother’s Day around the world.

While versions of Mother’s Day are celebrated throughout the world, traditions vary depending on the country. In Thailand, for example, Mother’s Day is always celebrated in August on the birthday of the current queen, Sirikit. Another alternate observance of Mother’s Day can be found in Ethiopia, where families gather each fall to sing songs and eat a large feast as part of Antrosht, a multi-day celebration honoring motherhood.

In the United States, Mother’s Day continues to be celebrated by presenting mothers and other women with gifts and flowers, and it has become one of the biggest holidays for consumer spending. Families might also celebrate by giving mothers a day off from activities like cooking or other household chores. At times Mother’s Day has also been a date for launching political or feminist causes. In 1968 Coretta Scott King, wife of Martin Luther King Jr., used Mother’s Day to host a march in support of underprivileged women and children. In the 1970s women’s groups also used the holiday as a time to highlight the need for equal rights and access to childcare.

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A “Mom” poem…of sorts.

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How we feel about Mom through the years.

 

At 6Yrs, “Mommy, I love you.”

At 10 Yrs, “Mom, whatever.”

At 16, “My Mom is soooo annoying.”

At 18, “I wanna leave this house.”

At 25, “Mom, you were so right.”

At 30, “I wanna go to Mom’s house.”

At 50, “I don’t wanna lose you, Mom.”

At 70, “I’d give up everything for one more day with my Mom.”

 

Hat/Tip Matt.

 

 

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Artists tell Easter story in shipping containers

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South Shields, a coastal town in the northeastern part of Britain on the River Tyne, is celebrating Easter a bit differently this year. Artists and folks from the local community are turning heads with their use of shipping containers to commemorate the Passion of the Christ on Good Friday.

 

So Happy Easter to all our loyal CH 2.0 readers, sit back and enjoy this video.

 

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