Bad News For Al Gore: 28 In Arizona, Temps In The ’30s In Florida…Record Cold Spell All Across The U.S.

Share

Your ads will be inserted here by

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

Lake-Michigan November 2014
The Frozen view of Lake Michigan and Chicago

Hat/Tip to Jon Erdman at Weather.com.

The only thing that is more mortally wounded than that bird on your Thanksgiving table is Al Gore’s Global Climate Warming Change fear factory. Record cold temperatures are being recorded all across the country. Waves of cold Arctic air are finding their way down into the “lower 48” and wreaking havoc along the way.

Record-Breaking November Arctic Cold

arctic-13nov14

 

Long Lasting Cold

Above is a European computer model of the Arctic blasts that are reaching their way deep into the Continental United States.

With blocking high pressure aloft over eastern Alaska and northwest Canada, a direct pipeline of cold air came from Siberia to near the North Pole, then southward into Canada and the U.S., particularly the Plains and Midwest. While not as cold in magnitude, the arctic surges have also swept into parts of the East, though there was a brief mild spell in between the first two cold snaps along the East Coast.

Here is the general timing of each arctic cold surge, and when the coldest air may ease:

First arctic surge: Spread into the East last week (November 11-15).

– Second arctic surge: Blasted through the East, Midwest, and South through early Thursday (November 16-20). For parts of the mid-Mississippi Valley, Ohio Valley, Tennessee Valley and the Middle Atlantic States, this was the coldest of the surges, with numerous daily record lows broken.

– Third arctic surge: Reached the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest Thursday, then slid east across the Great Lakes and parts of the Northeast on Friday. It did not press nearly as far south as the first and second surges did.

– Cold relief: Relief began in the Rockies, then expanded into the southern Plains and Southeast Wednesday and Thursday. Midwest and Northeast relief arrives this weekend.

United States Chill Map

Via Plymouth State Weather Center:

uschill

Other Cold Notables

– Burlington, Colorado, on the eastern Plains near the Kansas border, dipped to -10 Thursday, setting a new record low for the month of November.

– Casper, Wyoming, dipped to -27 at 11:59 p.m. Wednesday night, shattering their all-time November record low of -21 on Nov. 23, 1985 (records date to 1939). The temperature stayed at -27 at midnight Thursday, making it the new record low for Nov. 13 as well. Previously, the soonest Casper plunged to -27 was on Dec. 5, 1972. Casper’s high of 6 on Nov. 11 was the record earliest single-digit or colder high temperature there. (On Nov. 15, 1955, the high was only -3 degrees). Wednesday, Casper only managed a high of 3 degrees!

– Denver’s high of 6 on Nov. 12 was the coldest daily high so early in the season. Only three other November days had daily high temperatures colder in Denver, dating to 1872. Early Thursday morning, Denver chalked up a bone-chilling -14 degrees, easily the coldest temperature so early in the season. (Nov. 17, 1880 was the previous earliest such cold reading in Denver.)

– Livingston, Montana, dipped to minus 21 Wednesday, their coldest so early in the season. That said, they once dipped to minus 31 degrees just one day later in the calendar, on November 13, 1959.

– In the Southern Plains, Amarillo (21), Lubbock (27),  Childress (29) and Goodland (14) all set their coldest daily high temperatures on record for so early in the season on Wednesday.

– Riverton, Wyoming had a daytime high of 0 degrees Thursday.

Your ads will be inserted here by

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

– Redmond, Oregon, dropped to 19 degrees below zero Sunday morning, crushing its all-time record low for the month of November, previously 14 below zero on Nov. 15, 1955. Sunday’s low was an astonishing 23 degrees colder than the previous daily record for Nov. 16 in Redmond.

– Kansas City, Missouri set a record cool high of only 23 degrees on Monday, which beat the previous record of 24, which was set back in 1891.

– Joplin, Missouri set a record low for the month of November on Tuesday with a low temperature of 6 degrees.

– Paducah, Kentucky dropped to 10 degrees on Tuesday morning setting a record low and tying the third lowest temperature ever recorded in the month of November. The high temperature on Tuesday only reached 25 degrees, which is only the second time they have had a high that cold so early in the season.

– Valentine, Nebraska had a low of -12 on Tuesday morning, which shattered their previous record of 0.

– Dallas, Texas, saw highs of 45 degrees or colder for six consecutive days, Nov. 12 through Nov. 17. This is the longest such streak on record there in the month of November, besting a five-day streak in November 1937. (That month had a total of seven non-consecutive days with highs 45 or colder; that record still stands, for now.)

– Charlotte, North Carolina recorded a low of 14 degrees on Wednesday morning making it the coldest on record so early in the season.

– Charleston, West Virginia set a record low of 12 degrees on Wednesday, which made it the coldest on record for so early in the season.

– Macon, Georgia, plummeted to 17 degrees on Wednesday morning. Macon has never recorded a low in the teens or colder so early in the season since records began in 1892; in fact, the only other time they’ve seen teens in meteorological autumn (Sept. 1 to Nov. 30) was on Nov. 24-25, 1950, with lows of 19 and 10 degrees, respectively.

– Jacksonville, Florida dropped down to 24 degrees on Thursday morning, making it the coldest on record so early in the season. It is their third-coldest November reading on record, behind 23 degrees on Nov. 25, 1950, and 21 degrees exactly 20 years later on Nov. 25, 1970.

– South Bend, Indiana recorded eight consecutive days at or below freezing on Thursday, making it the longest streak on record for the month of November. The previous longest streaks were five days.

The Coldest Thanksgiving Since 1930?

Via WCCO Channel 4:

 

.

.

.

.

.

Share

Why We Eat Turkey On Thanksgiving Day

Share

Your ads will be inserted here by

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

 

When Americans sit down with their families for Thanksgiving dinner, most of us will probably gorge ourselves on the same traditional Thanksgiving menu, with turkey, cranberry sauce, stuffing, and pumpkin pie taking up the most real estate on our plates. How did these dishes become the national “what you eat on Thanksgiving” options, though?

THE PILGRIMS MAY NOT HAVE HAD TURKEY

Turkey may not have been on the menu at the 1621 celebration by the Pilgrims of Plymouth that is considered the First Thanksgiving (though historians and fans of Virginia’s Berkeley Plantation might quibble with the “First” part). There were definitely wild turkeys in the Plymouth area, as colonist William Bradford noted in his journal. However, the best existing account of the Pilgrims’ harvest feast comes from colonist Edward Winslow, author of Mourt’s Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. Winslow’s first-hand account of the First Thanksgiving included no explicit mention of turkey. He does, however, mention the Pilgrims gathering “wild fowl” for the meal, although that could just as likely have meant ducks or geese.

SO WHY DO WE CHOW DOWN ON TURKEY, THEN?

It helps to know a bit about the history of Thanksgiving. While the idea of giving thanks and celebrating the harvest was popular in certain parts of the country, it was by no means an annual national holiday. Presidents would occasionally declare a Thanksgiving Day celebration, but the holiday hadn’t completely caught on nationwide. Many of these early celebrations included turkey; Alexander Hamilton once remarked that, “No citizen of the U.S. shall refrain from turkey on Thanksgiving Day.”

When Bradford’s journals were reprinted in 1856 after being lost for a century, they found a receptive audience with advocates who wanted Thanksgiving turned into a national holiday. Since Bradford wrote of how the colonists had hunted wild turkeys during the autumn of 1621 and since turkey is a uniquely American (and scrumptious) bird, it gained traction as the Thanksgiving meal of choice for Americans after Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863.

Moreover, there were pragmatic reasons for eating turkey rather than, say, chicken at a feast like Thanksgiving. The birds are large enough that they can feed a table full of hungry family members, and unlike chickens or cows, they didn’t serve much utilitarian purpose like laying eggs or making milk. Unlike pork, turkey wasn’t so common that it didn’t seem like a suitable choice for a special occasion, either. An interesting 2007 piece in Slate discussed these reasons for turkey’s prominence, but also made another intriguing point. The publication of A Christmas Carol in 1843 may have helped force along the turkey’s cause as a holiday delicacy when Scrooge magnanimously sends the Cratchit family a Christmas turkey.

THERE WAS NO CRANBERRY SAUCE, EITHER

cranberry-sauce-istock.jpgWhile the cranberries the Pilgrims needed were probably easy to come by, making cranberry sauce requires sugar. Sugar was a rare luxury at the time of the First Thanksgiving, so while revelers may have eaten cranberries, it’s unlikely that the feast featured the tasty sauce. What’s more, it’s not even entirely clear that cranberry sauce had been invented yet. It’s not until 1663 that visitors to the area started commenting on a sweet sauce made of boiled cranberries that accompanied meat. There’s the same problem with potatoes. Neither sweet potatoes nor white potatoes were available to the colonists in 1621, so the Pilgrims definitely didn’t feast on everyone’s favorite tubers.

THEY DID HAVE PLENTY OF VENISON, THOUGH

Winslow mentions in his writings that the governor sent out a party of four men to do some fowling for the feast, but the Pilgrims and Wampanoag also enjoyed five deer as part of their feasting. The meat supposedly arrived at the celebration as a gift from the Wampanoag king Massasoit. On top of the venison, other meats probably included lots of fish and shellfish, which were staples of the Pilgrims’ diets. So if you want to wolf down a lobster or some oysters in lieu of turkey on Thursday, nobody can fault you for being historically inaccurate.

AND PUMPKIN PIE DIDN’T CAP THINGS OFF

pumpkin-pie.jpgIt may be the flagship dessert at modern Thanksgiving dinners, but pumpkin pie didn’t make an appearance at the First Thanksgiving. The Pilgrims probably lacked the butter and flour needed to make a pie crust, and it’s not clear that they even had an oven in which they could have baked a pumpkin pie. That doesn’t mean pumpkins weren’t available for the meal, though; they were probably served after being baked in the coals of a fire or stewed. Pumpkin pie became a popular dish on 17th-century American tables, though, and it might have shown up for Thanksgiving as early as the 1623 celebration of the holiday.

.

.

.

Share

Abraham Lincoln’s Proclamation Of Thanksgiving

Share

Lincoln-Thanksgiving-Proclamation

 

Proclamation of Thanksgiving

 

This is the proclamation which set the precedent for America’s national day of Thanksgiving. During his administration, President Lincoln issued many orders similar to this. For example, on November 28, 1861, he ordered government departments closed for a local day of thanksgiving.

Sarah Josepha Hale, a 74-year-old magazine editor, wrote a letter to Lincoln on September 28, 1863, urging him to have the “day of our annual Thanksgiving made a National and fixed Union Festival.” She explained, “You may have observed that, for some years past, there has been an increasing interest felt in our land to have the Thanksgiving held on the same day, in all the States; it now needs National recognition and authoritive fixation, only, to become permanently, an American custom and institution.”

Prior to this, each state scheduled its own Thanksgiving holiday at different times, mainly in New England and other Northern states. President Lincoln responded to Mrs. Hale’s request immediately, unlike several of his predecessors, who ignored her petitions altogether. In her letter to Lincoln she mentioned that she had been advocating a national thanksgiving date for 15 years as the editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book. George Washington was the first president to proclaim a day of thanksgiving, issuing his request on October 3, 1789, exactly 74 years before Lincoln’s.

The document below sets apart the last Thursday of November “as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise.” According to an April 1, 1864, letter from John Nicolay, one of President Lincoln’s secretaries, this document was written by Secretary of State William Seward, and the original was in his handwriting. On October 3, 1863, fellow Cabinet member Gideon Welles recorded in his diary how he complimented Seward on his work. A year later the manuscript was sold to benefit Union troops.

~~~~~~~~~~

Washington, D.C.
October 3, 1863

By the President of the United States of America.

A Proclamation.

The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle or the ship; the axe has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consiousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquillity and Union.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington, this Third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the Unites States the Eighty-eighth.

By the President: Abraham Lincoln

William H. Seward,
Secretary of State

.

.

.

 

Share

The Grinch Who Moved Thanksgiving

Share

FDR-Thanksgiving-Eleanor-nd

 

Over the river and through the wood, to Grandfather’s house we go…Ah, Thanksgiving, our loveliest secular holiday. Even the Masters of War can’t dislodge it – though FDR tried his damndest.

George Washington issued the first National Thanksgiving Proclamation on November 26, 1789, but the early presidents, disproportionately Virginian and of a states’ rights disposition, regarded such proclamations as excessively Yankee and Federalist. Even John Quincy Adams, the ultimate codfish President, was reluctant to be seen as “introducing New England manners” by a public acknowledgement of Thanksgiving.

The antebellum New England novelist and editor Sarah Josepha Hale is to Thanksgiving what Stevie Wonder is to Martin Luther King Day. The indefatigable Hale propagandized ceaselessly for the glory of late November Thursdays, pumpkin pie, roasted turkey, “savory stuffing”—everything but the Detroit Lions. It took 35 years and a civil war, but Mrs. Hale’s efforts paid off when President Lincoln declared the last Thursday in November a national day of Thanksgiving and a legal holiday.

Andrew Johnson, ever the contrarian, designated his first Thanksgiving Day in December, but his successor, Ulysses Grant, began a 70-year practice of setting the date on the last Thursday in November. The states were free to go their own ways, and Southern governors often opted for idiosyncratic observances or none at all. As Thanksgiving historian Diana Karter Applebaum notes, Texas Governor Oran Milo Roberts refused to declare Thanksgiving in the Lone Star State, sneering, “It’s a damned Yankee institution anyway.” But the South, too, eventually succumbed to this succulent and sacred day.

Then along came Franklin D. Roosevelt.

It seems that in 1939 Thanksgiving was to fall on November 30th, a matter of consternation to the big merchants of the National Retail Dry Goods Association (NRDGA). The presidents of Gimbel Brothers, Lord & Taylor, and other unsentimental vendors petitioned President Roosevelt to move Thanksgiving to the previous Thursday, November 23, thus creating an additional week of Christmas shopping—and to the astonishment of those Americans without dollar signs in their eyes, the President did so. (Not all merchants favored the shift. One Kokomo shopkeeper hung a sign in his window reading, “Do your shopping now. Who knows, tomorrow may be Christmas.”)

Opinion polls revealed that more than 60 percent of Americans opposed the Rooseveltian ukase; dissent was especially vigorous in New England. The selectmen of Plymouth, Massachusetts informed the President, “It is a religious holiday and [you] have no right to change it for commercial reasons.” Thanksgiving is a day to give thanks to the Almighty, harrumphed Governor Leverett Saltonstall of Massachusetts, “and not for the inauguration of Christmas shopping.”

Although the states customarily followed the federal government’s lead on Thanksgiving, they retained the right to set their own date for the holiday, so 48 battles erupted. As usual, New Deal foes had all the wit, if not the votes. A New Hampshire senator urged the President to abolish winter; the Oregon attorney general versified:

Thirty days hath September,

April, June, and November;

All the rest have thirty-one.

Until we hear from Washington.

Twenty-three states celebrated Thanksgiving 1939 on November 23, and another 23 stood fast with November 30. Two states, Colorado and Texas, shrugged their shoulders and celebrated both days—Texas did so to avoid having to move the Texas-Texas A&M football game.

This New Deal experiment in Gimbelism lasted two more years, until finally the NRDGA admitted that there was little difference in retail sales figures between the states that celebrated Thanksgiving early and those that clung to the traditional date. Without fanfare, President Roosevelt returned Thanksgiving 1942 to the last Thursday in November. Mark Sullivan remarked that this was the only New Deal initiative FDR ever renounced.

Just as Roosevelt’s megalomaniacal refusal to observe the two-term tradition set by George Washington necessitated the 22nd Amendment, so did his flouting of Thanksgiving precedent require corrective legislation. In a compromise of sorts, FDR signed into law a bill fixing Thanksgiving as the fourth Thursday—not the last Thursday—in November. Never again would Thanksgiving fall on November 29th or 30th. The states followed suit, although Texas held out until 1956.

As we gather together this Thanksgiving, say a silent thanks for Sarah Josepha Hale. And save a drumstick for the resisters—then and now.

.

.

.

Share

The Story of the First Thanksgiving 2014

Share

 

This is the annual CH 2.0 re-telling of the true story of the first Thanksgiving.

By Matt Ross

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I heard  this story years ago, so I thought I’d post it.

The official story has the pilgrims boarding the Mayflower, coming to America and establishing the Plymouth colony in the winter of 1620-21. This first winter is hard, and half the colonists die. But the survivors are hard working and tenacious, and they learn new farming techniques from the Indians. The harvest of 1621 is bountiful. The Pilgrims hold a celebration, and give thanks to God. They are grateful for the wonderful new abundant land He has given them.

The official story then has the Pilgrims living more or less happily ever after, each year repeating the first Thanksgiving. Other early colonies also have hard times at first, but they soon prosper and adopt the annual tradition of giving thanks for this prosperous new land called America.

The problem with this official story is that the harvest of 1621 was not bountiful, nor were the colonists hardworking or tenacious. 1621 was a famine year and many of the colonists were lazy thieves.

In his ‘History of Plymouth Plantation,’ the governor of the colony, William Bradford, reported that the colonists went hungry for years, because they refused to work in the fields. They preferred instead to steal food. He says the colony was riddled with “corruption,” and with “confusion and discontent.” The crops were small because “much was stolen both by night and day, before it became scarce eatable.”

In the harvest feasts of 1621 and 1622, “all had their hungry bellies filled,” but only briefly. The prevailing condition during those years was not the abundance the official story claims, it was famine and death. The first “Thanksgiving” was not so much a celebration as it was the last meal of condemned men.

But in subsequent years something changes. The harvest of 1623 was different. Suddenly, “instead of famine now God gave them plenty,” Bradford wrote, “and the face of things was changed, to the rejoicing of the hearts of many, for which they blessed God.” Thereafter, he wrote, “any general want or famine hath not been amongst them since to this day.” In fact, in 1624, so much food was produced that the colonists were able to begin exporting corn

What happened?

After the poor harvest of 1622, writes Bradford, “they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop.” They began to question their form of economic organization.

This had required that “all profits & benefits that are got by trade, working, fishing, or any other means” were to be placed in the common stock of the colony, and that, “all such persons as are of this colony, are to have their meat, drink, apparel, and all provisions out of the common stock.” A person was to put into the common stock all he could, and take out only what he needed.

This “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need” was an early form of socialism, and it is why the Pilgrims were starving. Bradford writes that “young men that are most able and fit for labor and service” complained about being forced to “spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children.” Also, “the strong, or man of parts, had no more in division of victuals and clothes, than he that was weak.” So the young and strong refused to work and the total amount of food produced was never adequate.

To rectify this situation, in 1623 Bradford abolished socialism. He gave each household a parcel of land and told them they could keep what they produced, or trade it away as they saw fit. In other words, he replaced socialism with a free market, and that was the end of famines.

Many early groups of colonists set up socialist states, all with the same terrible results. At Jamestown, established in 1607, out of every shipload of settlers that arrived, less than half would survive their first twelve months in America. Most of the work was being done by only one-fifth of the men, the other four-fifths choosing to be parasites. In the winter of 1609-10, called “The Starving Time,” the population fell from five-hundred to sixty.

Then the Jamestown colony was converted to a free market, and the results were every bit as dramatic as those at Plymouth. In 1614, Colony Secretary Ralph Hamor wrote that after the switch there was “plenty of food, which every man by his own industry may easily and doth procure.” He said that when the socialist system had prevailed, “we reaped not so much corn from the labors of thirty men as three men have done for themselves now.”

Happy Thanksgiving all.  Thanks for all of your comments and encouragement.

Source: Mises Institute

.

.

Share

Happy Thanksgiving? A Message From the Turkey Liberation Army

Share

OK, I know it’s a couple days off, but what the heck? Here is some good stuff from Manhattan Infidel!- Matt

Free the Turkeys!Free the Turkeys!

As Thanksgiving approaches and millions of Americans prepare to travel to visit their loved ones it is time to ask the all-important question:  Thanksgiving, why? In keeping with Manhattan Infidel’s official policy of what happens in the crawl space stays in the crawl space providing a forum for diverse viewpoints I now present  the Turkey Liberation Army’s take on this holiday. To get this scoop I was blindfolded and driven to a turkey “farm” outside the city where the leader of the TLA, a mysterious turkey named “Raul“, handed me their grievances written on a 8 by 11 paper.  I was then blindfolded again and driven back to the city.  As to how turkeys learned to drive, well I don’t have the answer to that.

The Official Manifesto of the Turkey Liberation Army

Comrades:

It is that time of year again when millions of our brothers will be slaughtered to feed the fat white man. Rise up and take back your birthright of freedom! The Turkey Liberation Army is a United and Federated grouping of turkeys oppressed by the fascist United States Government.  The Turkey Federated Republic fights for FREEDOM and SELF-DETERMINATION, INDEPENDENCE and a CRANBERRY SAUCE-FREE existence for all its peoples.

We of the TLA are no longer willing to allow the enemy of our people to murder, oppress, exploit and eat us with gravy and cranberry sauce.

We of the turkeys are not the ruling capitalist class and will build a new world order where there is true freedom and equality for all turkeys.

We are many turkeys but of one mind and have agreed that the exploitation of our turkeys must end.

Therefore we of the TLA offer to all liberation movements, revolutionary workers, groups and peoples our total aid and support in the struggle for freedom and justice within the fascist cranberry sauce-eating United States.

The Goals of the Turkey Liberation Army

  1. To united all oppressed turkeys into a fighting force and to destroy the system of the capitalist state and its cranberry sauce and gravy.
  2. To assure the rights of all turkeys to self-determination and the right to build their own nation and government.
  3. To build a people’s federated council who shall be the representatives of the turkey people who shall have the right to form trade pacts and unite for mutual defense against the capitalist oppressor and his cranberry sauce.
  4. To aid and defend the cultural rights of turkeys (a culture which most assuredly does not celebrate Thanksgiving).
  5. To place control of all institutions and industries into the hands of the turkey peoples.
  6. To give back to all turkeys their turkey and constitutional rights to liberty, equality, justice and cranberry sauce-free existence and the right to keep and bear arms in defense of these rights.
  7. To create a system where free turkey love will be the norm and to destroy all chains instituted by legal and societal norms of the capitalist cranberry sauce state.
  8. To destroy the turkey “farm” system which the capitalist cranberry sauce state has used to imprison the oppressed and exploited turkey peoples.
  9. To take over all state land and give them back to the turkeys.
  10. To take control of all building and apartment buildings of the capitalist cranberry sauce-eating class and to destroy the rent system of exploitation. (The turkey proletariat have been historically oppressed by high rent!)

And so comrades, may this year see the beginnings of the Turkey and Cranberry Sauce-Free State!

 Gobble Gobble!

And remember your turkey parents because they remember you!

You know all this talk of turkey and cranberry sauce has made me hungry.  I can’t wait to chow down on a good turkey meal tomorrow!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Original Post: Manhattan Infidel

Share

Happy Thanksgiving from Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services

Share

This turkey died so that white man can live his sinful lifestyle!

Hello Americans of all races, religions and sexual preferences!  I am Kathleen Sebelius the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. And yes, I am a human woman.

I am not an animal!  I am a human being!

No.  I am not a Romulan woman who’s had her ears scaled back.  I am a fully functioning human though many have mistaken me for a Romulan.  Silly isn’t it?  I mean I’m not even closely related to Vulcans like the Romulans are.  Look, I am not an animal, I am a human being!  So knock it off!

Anyway.  What did I want to talk about?

Oh yes.

As you know the so-called holiday of Thanksgiving is fast approaching.  But what you may not know is that Thanksgiving was promulgated by the white man after massacring native Americans of color.  And yes I realize that the noble race of native Americans were here on this continent before the country of America the slave holders came into existence so calling them “Americans” is an insult but “native American” is easier to type on my English language keyboard than finding a software program that’ll type in a dialect of the indigenous peoples of this continent.

Oh I’m sure there are software programs that do just that but here at the Department of Health and Human Services I am too busy trying to undo the damage caused by triumphalist American culture to go online and search for it.

Because we at the Department of Health and Humans Services are all about two things:  protecting the health of all Americans and screwing the Catholic Church.

Did I say we were about two thing?  I’m sorry.  Three things:  protecting the health of all Americans, undoing the damage caused by meat-based culture and screwing the Catholic Church.

Did you know the Catholic Church is run by white men?  And that can’t be good.

Anyway I’m sure you are probably looking forward to a traditional Thanksgiving with lots of turkey followed by a few games of American football.  (And isn’t typical of arrogant Americans?  Stealing the name of football from non-racist, socialist Europeans and applying it to a game that has nothing to do with feet.  God.  Americans make me sick.)

Oh yes.  I’m sure you are looking forward to that meal.  Sounds like fun doesn’t it? Maybe to the dull-witted it does.

Lift up your minds Americans!

Meat is murder!  And your so-called game of football is violent, misogynistic and encourages testosterone-laden behavior.  Typical testosterone-laden behavior I’d expect from the soon to be crushed Catholic Church.

And so, under the authority granted to me by the Affordable Care Act I am banning the consumption of meat, meat by-products and any sandwiches sold at Blimpies which may or may not be meat or meat by-products.  (We’re still testing them at HHS to find out exactly what they are.)

I am also banning the so-called game of football.  (Did a Catholic invent this game?  I wouldn’t be surprised.)

I am also changing the name of this holiday.  Thanksgiving? What have you to be thankful for?  Thousands of years of northern European aggression, patriarchy and poor dietary choices?

No.  The new name will be “Redistribution Day.“  It is my hope that by calling it “Redistribution Day” we will remember that there are fat cat bankers and capitalists in our midst who aren’t paying their fair share.  Just like the Catholic Church.

And instead of meat why not eat something the government wants you to eat such as carrots or Brussels sprout?

And instead of so-called football why not watch the WNBA?  Women’s basketball.  Truly a sport uninfluenced by testosterone.  What better way to lift up your minds than by watching seven-foot tall lesbians of color?

And so in closing I’d like to wish all my fellow Americans a very happy and joyous Redistribution Day.

Because we at the Department of Health and Human Services are all about two, no three, no four things:  protecting the health of all Americans, undoing the damage caused by meat-based culture, social engineering and screwing the Catholic Church.

That is all.

Original Post: Manhattan Infidel

Share

Larry Hagman, Known Best as J.R. Ewing on Dallas, Dead at 81

Share

Larry Hagman, best known as the despicable J.R. Ewing on the long running show “Dallas,” has died at age 81.  Dallas News has more…

Larry was back in his beloved Dallas re-enacting the iconic role he loved most,” his family said in a written statement. “Larry’s family and close friends had joined him in Dallas for the Thanksgiving holiday. When he passed, he was surrounded by loved ones. It was a peaceful passing, just as he had wished for. The family requests privacy at this time.”

The role of J.R. transformed Mr. Hagman’s life. He rocketed from being a merely well-known TV actor on I Dream of Jeannie and the son of Broadway legend Mary Martin, to the kind of international fame known only by the likes the Beatles and Muhammad Ali.

Mr. Hagman made his home in California with his wife of 59 years, the former Maj Axelsson. Despite obvious physical frailty, he gamely returned to Dallas to film season one and part of season two of TNT’s Dallas reboot.

As noted, Hagman was in poor health after a struggle with cancer.  An official cause of death is unavailable at the time of this writing.

Share

SEIU Considers Work Stoppage on Thanksgiving: The “More” to the Story

Share

So, the SEIU wants to do a work stoppage at one of the busiest airports, and on the busiest travel day of the year.  Typically, we’d just look at this as yet another, “union goons screw up everyone’s holiday to get what they want.”  But, there is more to it than meets the eye.  For the preliminaries, take a look at this from Stop the ACLU…

(CBS LA) Employees at Los Angeles International Airport were considering plans Friday to walk off the job ahead on what is traditionally the busiest traveling day of the year.

But, hey, they really, really care or something.

A coalition of Southland labor and community leaders are calling for the protest of alleged violations by LAX contractor Aviation Safeguards (AVSG) after breaking their contract with the airport earlier this year.

Andrew Gross-Gaitan, the director of the Southern California Airports Division of SEIU, told KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO that AVSG left more than 400 LAX workers without affordable family health care when it failed to comply with the city’s Living Wage Ordinance.

As many as 1,000 airport workers and union supporters are expected to march on Century Boulevard just as an estimated 1.8 million passengers are expected to travel through LAX over the holiday weekend.

SEIU marched in March, but there were not real delays. Now, Gross-Gaitan says ““It’s entirely possible there will be significant travel delays.” And big delays at a big airport can have a ripple effect across the country, as planes arrive very late at other airports, gumming up the works.

Now, the casual observer will look at this and think that the poor workers were cheating the workers.  But that is where the rest of the story comes in…

(LA Times) Company officials said their employees voted in December to reject or decertify their collective bargaining agreement with the SEIU before its expiration date. Since then, hourly wages have improved for the vast majority of employees, they said, and workers can choose the type of healthcare plan they want.

Now wait just a second here.  I thought the Union mantra is “this is what democracy looks like?”  I mean, if the workers VOTED, isn’t that DEMOCRACY?  Or, is this like any other leftist scenario, and it’s really only “democracy” if they win?

Share

Thanksgiving Link-Around 2011

Share

Here are some Thanksgiving links from our friends…

Adrienne’s Corner

Thanksgiving…

 

All American Blogger

Happy Thanksgiving from All American Blogger!

 

Always on Watch

Thanksgiving 2011

 

America’s Watchtower

Happy Thanksgiving

 

An Ol’Broad’s Ramblings

“Gracious Gifts of the Most High God”

 

Be Sure You’re RIGHT, Then Go Ahead

Happy Thanksgiving 2011

 

Bunkerville

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Capitol Commentary

Thanksgiving: The Only Holiday Not Ruined

 

Caught Him With a Corndog

Get Ready Turkey Lovers

 

Hot Air

NFL Thanksgiving Day open thread

 

Just a Conservative Girl

Something to be Thankful For – Life from Conception to Birth Visualized

 

Manhattan Infidel

Occupy Plymouth Rock!

 

Nebraska Energy Observer

Happy Thanksgiving

 

Nice Deb

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Nonsensible Shoes

Give Thanks.

 

Political Clown Parade

Thanksgiving: America Coming Home

 

Reluctant-Rebel

Happy Thanksgiving Day!

 

Republican Redefined

Happy Turkey Day Folks

 

Sister Toldjah

The forgotten lesson of Thanksgiving

 

Texas Fred

The Ghost of Thanksgiving Yet to Come

 

THE ASTUTE BLOGGERS

THE PILGRIMS: OCCUPY AMERICA 1620

 

The Camp of the Saints

Thanksgiving 2011 At TCOTS

 

The Country Thinker

Celebrating Turkeys (the ones in office, not in the oven…)

 

The Sentry Journal

Video: Fast Turkey Documentary

 

The TrogloPundit

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Voting American

Happy Thanksgiving America and may God Bless the United States of America

 

Woodsterman

Happy Thanksgiving Three For Thursday

 

WyBlog

I hope everyone has a happy and safe Thanksgiving.

Share

The Story of the First Thanksgiving 2011

Share

This is the annual CH 2.0 re-telling of the true story of the first Thanksgiving.  Given the type of society advocated by OWS, this story is more relevant today than ever.  

I heard  this story years ago, so I thought I’d post it.

The official story has the pilgrims boarding the Mayflower, coming to America and establishing the Plymouth colony in the winter of 1620-21. This first winter is hard, and half the colonists die. But the survivors are hard working and tenacious, and they learn new farming techniques from the Indians. The harvest of 1621 is bountiful. The Pilgrims hold a celebration, and give thanks to God. They are grateful for the wonderful new abundant land He has given them.

The official story then has the Pilgrims living more or less happily ever after, each year repeating the first Thanksgiving. Other early colonies also have hard times at first, but they soon prosper and adopt the annual tradition of giving thanks for this prosperous new land called America.

The problem with this official story is that the harvest of 1621 was not bountiful, nor were the colonists hardworking or tenacious. 1621 was a famine year and many of the colonists were lazy thieves.

In his ‘History of Plymouth Plantation,’ the governor of the colony, William Bradford, reported that the colonists went hungry for years, because they refused to work in the fields. They preferred instead to steal food. He says the colony was riddled with “corruption,” and with “confusion and discontent.” The crops were small because “much was stolen both by night and day, before it became scarce eatable.”

In the harvest feasts of 1621 and 1622, “all had their hungry bellies filled,” but only briefly. The prevailing condition during those years was not the abundance the official story claims, it was famine and death. The first “Thanksgiving” was not so much a celebration as it was the last meal of condemned men.

But in subsequent years something changes. The harvest of 1623 was different. Suddenly, “instead of famine now God gave them plenty,” Bradford wrote, “and the face of things was changed, to the rejoicing of the hearts of many, for which they blessed God.” Thereafter, he wrote, “any general want or famine hath not been amongst them since to this day.” In fact, in 1624, so much food was produced that the colonists were able to begin exporting corn.

What happened?

After the poor harvest of 1622, writes Bradford, “they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop.” They began to question their form of economic organization.

This had required that “all profits & benefits that are got by trade, working, fishing, or any other means” were to be placed in the common stock of the colony, and that, “all such persons as are of this colony, are to have their meat, drink, apparel, and all provisions out of the common stock.” A person was to put into the common stock all he could, and take out only what he needed.

This “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need” was an early form of socialism, and it is why the Pilgrims were starving. Bradford writes that “young men that are most able and fit for labor and service” complained about being forced to “spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children.” Also, “the strong, or man of parts, had no more in division of victuals and clothes, than he that was weak.” So the young and strong refused to work and the total amount of food produced was never adequate.

To rectify this situation, in 1623 Bradford abolished socialism. He gave each household a parcel of land and told them they could keep what they produced, or trade it away as they saw fit. In other words, he replaced socialism with a free market, and that was the end of famines.

Many early groups of colonists set up socialist states, all with the same terrible results. At Jamestown, established in 1607, out of every shipload of settlers that arrived, less than half would survive their first twelve months in America. Most of the work was being done by only one-fifth of the men, the other four-fifths choosing to be parasites. In the winter of 1609-10, called “The Starving Time,” the population fell from five-hundred to sixty.

Then the Jamestown colony was converted to a free market, and the results were every bit as dramatic as those at Plymouth. In 1614, Colony Secretary Ralph Hamor wrote that after the switch there was “plenty of food, which every man by his own industry may easily and doth procure.” He said that when the socialist system had prevailed, “we reaped not so much corn from the labors of thirty men as three men have done for themselves now.”

Happy Thanksgiving all.  Thanks for all of your comments and encouragement.

Source: http://mises.org/story/336

Share

Sunday Links: Thanksgiving Edition

Share

Welcome to Sunday folks!  It was yet another long week, but we have a holiday coming up, so let’s take some time to reflect on that, as well as take a look at some great Conservative links.  I’m still in the process of getting the blog, and blogroll back  in order, so let me know if I have missed anyone.

4 Walls and a View

 

A Conservative Teacher

 

Ace of Spades HQ

 

Adrienne’s Corner

 

All American Blogger

 

Always on Watch

 

America Speaks Ink

America’s Watchtower

 

American Perspective

 

An Ol’Broad’s Ramblings

 

Another Black Conservative

 

ARRA News Service

 

Atlas Shrugs

Be Sure You’re RIGHT, Then Go Ahead

 

Blogs for Borders

 

Bunkerville

 

Campus Reform Blog

 

Capitol Commentary

 

Catholibertarian

 

Caught Him With a Corndog

 

Cmblake6’s Weblog

 

Conservative Hideout RapidFire

 

Conservatives on Fire

Da Tech Guy

 

Down Under on the Right Side

 

Eastern Right

 

Freedom, By The Way

 

Frugal Cafe Blog Zone

 

Full Metal Patriot

 

Grizzly Groundswell

 

Gun Toting, Bible Thumping, Bitter Americans

 

H & B

 

Hot Air

Innominatus

 

Instapundit

 

IowaHawk

 

Knuckledraggin my life away

 

Labor Union Report

 

Left-Wing Institute for Civil Discourse

 

Liberty At Stake

 

Liberty Works

 

Lonely Conservative

 

Manhattan Infidel

 

Mind Numbed Robot

 

Motor City Times

 

Muellerstuff

Nebraska Energy Observer

 

Nice Deb

 

NoneOfAnyImport

 

Nuke Gingrich

 

Political Clown Parade

 

Political Policy

 

Politics in Northeast Pennsylvania

 

Randy’s Roundtable

 

Reaganite Republican

 

RedStateEclectic

 

Reluctant-Rebel

 

Republican Redefined

 

Right Klik

 

Rightlinks

Sister Toldjah

 

Sitting on the Edge of the Sandbox, Biting my Tongue

 

Soylent Green

 

Speak Up

 

Spellchek

 

Start Thinking Right

 

Tea Party America

 

TeresAmerica

 

Texas Fred

 

The Amusing Bunni’s Musings

 

THE ASTUTE BLOGGERS

 

The Camp of the Saints

 

The Classic Liberal

 

The Conservative Cloakroom

 

The Conservative Guild

 

The Conservative Lady

 

The Conservative Pup

The Country Thinker

 

The Daley Gator

 

The Immoderate Blog

 

The Other McCain

 

The republican Mother

 

The Resistance

 

The Scottcarp Dream

 

The Sentry Journal

 

The Silent Majority

 

To be Right

 

USA Partisan 2009

 

Verum Serum

 

Voting American

 

Washington Rebel

 

Western Front America

 

Western Hero

 

What Would The Founders Think?

 

Woman Honor Thyself

 

Woodsterman

 

WyBlog

 

Zilla of the Resistance

I hope everyone has a great day.  Posting might be a bit light in the coming week, with the holiday and all.  However, I will do my best to get posts up, and make some rounds, if at all possible.

Share

The Story of the First Thanksgiving

Share

This is a re-post from last year.  I could think of nothing better to write, other than to wish all of you a Happy and “grope free” Thanksgiving!

I heard  this story years ago, so I thought I’d post it.

The official story has the pilgrims boarding the Mayflower, coming to America and establishing the Plymouth colony in the winter of 1620-21. This first winter is hard, and half the colonists die. But the survivors are hard working and tenacious, and they learn new farming techniques from the Indians. The harvest of 1621 is bountiful. The Pilgrims hold a celebration, and give thanks to God. They are grateful for the wonderful new abundant land He has given them.

The official story then has the Pilgrims living more or less happily ever after, each year repeating the first Thanksgiving. Other early colonies also have hard times at first, but they soon prosper and adopt the annual tradition of giving thanks for this prosperous new land called America.

The problem with this official story is that the harvest of 1621 was not bountiful, nor were the colonists hardworking or tenacious. 1621 was a famine year and many of the colonists were lazy thieves.

In his ‘History of Plymouth Plantation,’ the governor of the colony, William Bradford, reported that the colonists went hungry for years, because they refused to work in the fields. They preferred instead to steal food. He says the colony was riddled with “corruption,” and with “confusion and discontent.” The crops were small because “much was stolen both by night and day, before it became scarce eatable.”

In the harvest feasts of 1621 and 1622, “all had their hungry bellies filled,” but only briefly. The prevailing condition during those years was not the abundance the official story claims, it was famine and death. The first “Thanksgiving” was not so much a celebration as it was the last meal of condemned men.

But in subsequent years something changes. The harvest of 1623 was different. Suddenly, “instead of famine now God gave them plenty,” Bradford wrote, “and the face of things was changed, to the rejoicing of the hearts of many, for which they blessed God.” Thereafter, he wrote, “any general want or famine hath not been amongst them since to this day.” In fact, in 1624, so much food was produced that the colonists were able to begin exporting corn.

What happened?

After the poor harvest of 1622, writes Bradford, “they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop.” They began to question their form of economic organization.

This had required that “all profits & benefits that are got by trade, working, fishing, or any other means” were to be placed in the common stock of the colony, and that, “all such persons as are of this colony, are to have their meat, drink, apparel, and all provisions out of the common stock.” A person was to put into the common stock all he could, and take out only what he needed.

This “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need” was an early form of socialism, and it is why the Pilgrims were starving. Bradford writes that “young men that are most able and fit for labor and service” complained about being forced to “spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children.” Also, “the strong, or man of parts, had no more in division of victuals and clothes, than he that was weak.” So the young and strong refused to work and the total amount of food produced was never adequate.

To rectify this situation, in 1623 Bradford abolished socialism. He gave each household a parcel of land and told them they could keep what they produced, or trade it away as they saw fit. In other words, he replaced socialism with a free market, and that was the end of famines.

Many early groups of colonists set up socialist states, all with the same terrible results. At Jamestown, established in 1607, out of every shipload of settlers that arrived, less than half would survive their first twelve months in America. Most of the work was being done by only one-fifth of the men, the other four-fifths choosing to be parasites. In the winter of 1609-10, called “The Starving Time,” the population fell from five-hundred to sixty.

Then the Jamestown colony was converted to a free market, and the results were every bit as dramatic as those at Plymouth. In 1614, Colony Secretary Ralph Hamor wrote that after the switch there was “plenty of food, which every man by his own industry may easily and doth procure.” He said that when the socialist system had prevailed, “we reaped not so much corn from the labors of thirty men as three men have done for themselves now.”

Happy Thanksgiving all.  Thanks for all of your comments and encouragement.

Source: http://mises.org/story/336

Share

The First Thanksgiving

Share

I heard  this story years ago, so I thought I’d post it.

The official story has the pilgrims boarding the Mayflower, coming to America and establishing the Plymouth colony in the winter of 1620-21. This first winter is hard, and half the colonists die. But the survivors are hard working and tenacious, and they learn new farming techniques from the Indians. The harvest of 1621 is bountiful. The Pilgrims hold a celebration, and give thanks to God. They are grateful for the wonderful new abundant land He has given them.

The official story then has the Pilgrims living more or less happily ever after, each year repeating the first Thanksgiving. Other early colonies also have hard times at first, but they soon prosper and adopt the annual tradition of giving thanks for this prosperous new land called America.

The problem with this official story is that the harvest of 1621 was not bountiful, nor were the colonists hardworking or tenacious. 1621 was a famine year and many of the colonists were lazy thieves.

In his ‘History of Plymouth Plantation,’ the governor of the colony, William Bradford, reported that the colonists went hungry for years, because they refused to work in the fields. They preferred instead to steal food. He says the colony was riddled with “corruption,” and with “confusion and discontent.” The crops were small because “much was stolen both by night and day, before it became scarce eatable.”

In the harvest feasts of 1621 and 1622, “all had their hungry bellies filled,” but only briefly. The prevailing condition during those years was not the abundance the official story claims, it was famine and death. The first “Thanksgiving” was not so much a celebration as it was the last meal of condemned men.

But in subsequent years something changes. The harvest of 1623 was different. Suddenly, “instead of famine now God gave them plenty,” Bradford wrote, “and the face of things was changed, to the rejoicing of the hearts of many, for which they blessed God.” Thereafter, he wrote, “any general want or famine hath not been amongst them since to this day.” In fact, in 1624, so much food was produced that the colonists were able to begin exporting corn.

What happened?

After the poor harvest of 1622, writes Bradford, “they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop.” They began to question their form of economic organization.

This had required that “all profits & benefits that are got by trade, working, fishing, or any other means” were to be placed in the common stock of the colony, and that, “all such persons as are of this colony, are to have their meat, drink, apparel, and all provisions out of the common stock.” A person was to put into the common stock all he could, and take out only what he needed.

This “from each according to his ability, to each according to his need” was an early form of socialism, and it is why the Pilgrims were starving. Bradford writes that “young men that are most able and fit for labor and service” complained about being forced to “spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children.” Also, “the strong, or man of parts, had no more in division of victuals and clothes, than he that was weak.” So the young and strong refused to work and the total amount of food produced was never adequate.

To rectify this situation, in 1623 Bradford abolished socialism. He gave each household a parcel of land and told them they could keep what they produced, or trade it away as they saw fit. In other words, he replaced socialism with a free market, and that was the end of famines.

Many early groups of colonists set up socialist states, all with the same terrible results. At Jamestown, established in 1607, out of every shipload of settlers that arrived, less than half would survive their first twelve months in America. Most of the work was being done by only one-fifth of the men, the other four-fifths choosing to be parasites. In the winter of 1609-10, called “The Starving Time,” the population fell from five-hundred to sixty.

Then the Jamestown colony was converted to a free market, and the results were every bit as dramatic as those at Plymouth. In 1614, Colony Secretary Ralph Hamor wrote that after the switch there was “plenty of food, which every man by his own industry may easily and doth procure.” He said that when the socialist system had prevailed, “we reaped not so much corn from the labors of thirty men as three men have done for themselves now.”

Happy Thanksgiving all.  Thanks for all of your comments and encouragement.

Source:  http://mises.org/story/336

Share